Communication In Business Services Firms

Good communication in business services firms can make or break a sale. When you market your company and services, the only thing a prospective client cares about is what you will be able to do for them. Clearly communicating that with them isn’t as simple as displaying a list of services. It involves give and take and a thorough understanding of the prospects in your marketplace.

To apply the principles of good communication, you can start by learning as much as you can about your prospects. Understand their desires and their pain. Identify their needs and prepare for your meetings accordingly.

You can anticipate generic problems that your prospect might have, not just company specific ones or problems inherent in the industry. Your client expects you to be ahead of that curve. If you are pitching a new service to an existing client, can you communicate how you might help the customer become an internal problem-solver or address pandemic challenges. You can actually help transform your client’s liability into an asset through quality communication.

In some industries clients might be afraid that they’re not working with the newest equipment, or perhaps they feel they can’t increase product production speed and efficiency. Another fear that clients experience is the fear of lagging behind, not being able to match their competitors or serve their customers with the best products or services. There could be a fear that they won’t be able to apply state-of-the-art information systems, improve client communications, or have a market-savvy web site. These fears can be allayed by offering the value of your perspective along with open, clear communication.

Another difficulty common in sales situations may be the need to overcome hidden decision making. This is an excellent example of the need for communication in business services firms. A firm’s strategy must include a systematic approach to finding out what the decision makers won’t reveal on their own. Do you know who is the real buyer of the service or product you are selling? Who is the real user? When are the decision maker and the person the company sent to the sales meeting actually the same person? Having clear communication with your sales team and with your prospects will alleviate the tangle that can result from the absence of this information.

The way you sell products and services should directly reflect the way you work internally. Where it’s appropriate, you may want to propose regular meetings with your team and include budget reviews as items on the agenda. Likewise, you’ll want to make the buyer feel just how assiduous you are in keeping them aware of what is happening and how much it is costing. This level of communication is uncommon in business services firms, but it can make or break the future of your client relationships. Your investment in communication will translate directly to your bottom line.